Games

New Trailer Highlights The Action-RPG's Bloody Gameplay Pillars

Game Informer News Feed - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 16:24

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr is coming out next week, and there's a lot to do in the action-RPG. Developer Neocore Games has released a lifeline to prospective players in the form of a new trailer. It highlights the game's biggest (and bloodiest) pillars and also shows off plenty of in-game action.

Take a look at the video below to see the game's combat, upgrade paths, cover system, bosses, and much more.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Look for Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on June 5.

Categories: Games

The Mobile Action Game Shows Off Its Moves

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 22:27

World of Demons, the first PlatinumGames title that's made for mobile phones, has a brand new gameplay trailer.

The new trailer shows off more of the action gameplay people have come to expect from PlatinumGames, as well as some of the title's other features, like the demon summoning and asymmetric multiplayer. You can watch the trailer below.

World of Demons is scheduled for release this summer for both iOS and Android.

Categories: Games

The Mobile Action Game Shows Off Its Moves

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 22:27

World of Demons, the first PlatinumGames title that's made for mobile phones, has a brand new gameplay trailer.

The new trailer shows off more of the action gameplay people have come to expect from PlatinumGames, as well as some of the title's other features, like the demon summoning and asymmetric multiplayer. You can watch the trailer below.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

World of Demons is scheduled for release this summer for both iOS and Android.

Categories: Games

Agony Review: A Captivating Disappointment

Gamespot News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 17:00

Hell, by its very nature, shouldn't be enjoyed, but there's still something enthralling and entertaining in seeing creators imagine it in various ways. Agony, on the other hand, is less about Hell as a vehicle for entertainment or even fear. Agony's version of Hell is simply a place of unimaginable horror. It is depraved beyond reckoning, a place whose very brick and mortar is composed of atrocities. It is a place that never opens its sick, emaciated maw except to blaspheme and torment. Hell is terrifying in Agony, which goes hand in hand with the fact that the game is also torturous to play.

In Agony, you are a freshly fallen wretch who wakes up at the gates of Hell with his memories--including his true name--burned away during the trip down. Under normal circumstances, it'd be torture time for the rest of eternity, but somehow, the new meat walks through the gates with most of his wits about him, and only one piece of knowledge: that Hell has a guardian angel, the Red Goddess. Only she can help him regain his lost memories, and help him escape perdition. So begins a long, arduous journey of survival horror--closer in function to Clock Tower or Alien Isolation than Resident Evil--to meet the Goddess, and beg for her dark blessing.

Agony's single most breathtaking achievement is Hell itself. It is an enormous, heretical province of terror, the ungodly conceptual Venn diagram between Hieronymous Bosch, H.R. Giger, and Clive Barker. The very ground you wake up on in the game's first level is made of rotting pink flesh, the mortar made from the crushed bodies and blood of the hideous unborn, a process a later cutscene even shows you in great detail. The architecture all around you is a pulsating gothic nightmare, cathedrals of wide-eyed corpses and skeletons, some of whom are still alive, trapped twitching inside for eternity.

It's because the world itself is so impressive that the enemy design then comes across so disappointing and predictable. While beautiful in detail, demons look mostly like the typical Doom interpretation of demons, and female variants tend to veer closer to being strippers-with-sharp-teeth as opposed to something legitimately imaginative. The Red Goddess herself is a near constant source of eyerolls, mostly coming off as a bloodied burlesque performer, with an inappropriately over-the-top voice performance that wouldn't be out of place in a commercial for a sex hotline. There are design elements that push the envelope--mostly centered around some truly unsettling perversions of genitalia--but the game's ham-handed attempts to be sexy, even in a sinister manner, is incongruous with the skin-crawling nature of the rest of the game.

All the wretched humans shambling around Hell--you included--are little more than desiccated revenants. You can walk--or, more accurately, shuffle along at a snail's pace--perform a limited sprint, and jump. There are no weapons to be had, though you can pick up torches, which provide light, but little else. When you come across an enemy, you have only three options: run or hide. You can technically sneak around, and there’s even a power-up to be gained later that supposedly lessens the noise you make. It is still very, very easy to be heard and seen, hiding spots aren't always close by, and aside from a rising musical sting, there’s no indicator of where exactly an enemy is in relation to you.

There's only a few different classes of enemy you see throughout your play time, ranging from swarms of insects to Lovecraftian behemoths that can snatch up your soul. With only a couple of exceptions, getting caught by an enemy is typically a one- or two-hit death. As such, an hour's work can be flushed down the toilet just by hitting the wrong enemy in a group. Later on, you can actually possess a few classes of demon, but this is never as empowering or thrilling as you might expect. Agony doesn't seem to know how to capitalize on its most promising aspects.

You do, however, have one big trick up your shriveled sleeve: if you should die another death in Hell, your soul can actually fly out of your current body, and forcibly possess another. That's only if you can find a vulnerable victim, though, and pull off the black shroud preventing them from being possessed. Otherwise, after about 10-15 seconds of being dead again, your soul dies a true death. The trick of it is not just finding the last person you unshrouded, but typically finding them in a maze, with an extremely limited and obscured field of vision while disembodied. If/when you die, the Goddess keeps you in Hell, though, and sends you back to the last checkpoint. Even then, checkpoints are a whole other problem. They're represented by a special mirror, where a soul must be sacrificed, but the mirrors are hidden deep in each level. Agony treats basic progressional milestones the way most games treat obscure collectibles.

The checkpoint issue is one tiny facet of the game's overarching issue: Hell is too big for its own good. Your one navigational tool, the Destiny Lines, sends out a little neon cluster of lights that can point you in the right direction, but often the cluster gets just as confused as you are, leading you through walls or ceilings, instead of along a proper route, which can be difficult to discern in the chaotic and painfully dim environments. In addition, on the game's default difficulty, the Lines are a limited resource. The idea here is sound, if the idea was, in fact, to make surviving in Hell feel like a Sisyphean struggle, wandering a realm that mortal men have no mastery over. It doesn't make for an enjoyable experience.

When you're not losing chunks of progress, the rest of the game pits you up against two types of glorified scavenger hunts: collecting a small number of important objects and arranging them in a very specific way to open a door, or finding the correct sigil among dozens written in the environment that will unlock the next area. The first kind is usually easy enough, though oddly, the most difficult one in the game is right at the beginning, where you're thrown into an expansive labyrinth full of enemies, and no way to save your progress when you've grabbed any of the resources you need to continue. Others are easier, but still more of a trudging annoyance than anything. The second kind involves exploring around to find the sigil, often involving backtracks into dangerous areas, only to get back to the door and discover the sigil you picked up doesn't unlock your door. This kind of slow and infuriating repetition typifies Agony from start to finish.

These are issues ironically exacerbated by the fact that it's all taking place in one of the most abominable, depressing, and fundamentally disgusting environments imaginable. Worst of all, you grow numb to Agony's uniquely repulsive flair over time. You start thinking about the environment in practical nonplussed terms, instead of the grim wonder that strikes you in the beginning. Distress turns to disinterest, then--even as the bigger revelations about the protagonist and the nature of his torture come to light--turn to total apathy. I entered Agony’s Gates of Hell with a slack-jawed gasp. It is such a disappointment to have to have left it with a shrug.

Categories: Games

New Screenshots Show Off Gory Thrills

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 16:08

10 Chambers Collective, an indie Swedish company led by Payday developers, made waves last year when it revealed the horror-focused co-op game GTFO. The trailer was brief but got the message across: you and your friends work together to complete objectives while fending off nasty monsters.

We haven't heard much about the game, developed on the Unity engine, since that trailer. However, today 10 Chambers Collective revealed some goopy screenshots that give you a good idea of the level of violence you can expect from the game, as well as a glimpse of a jellyfish-lookin' monster. Scroll down below to see all the screens.

GTFO is due out this year and 10 Chambers Collective says that the game will be playable at E3. For more on GTFO, you can watch the reveal trailer here.

Categories: Games

New Screenshots Show Off Gory Thrills

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 16:08

10 Chambers Collective, an indie Swedish company led by Payday developers, made waves last year when it revealed the horror-focused co-op game GTFO. The trailer was brief but got the message across: you and your friends work together to complete objectives while fending off nasty monsters.

We haven't heard much about the game, developed on the Unity engine, since that trailer. However, today 10 Chambers Collective revealed some goopy screenshots that give you a good idea of the level of violence you can expect from the game, as well as a glimpse of a jellyfish-lookin' monster. Scroll down below to see all the screens.

GTFO is due out this year and 10 Chambers Collective says that the game will be playable at E3. For more on GTFO, you can watch the reveal trailer here.

Categories: Games

New Soulcalibur VI Trailer Showcases Maxi's Return

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 15:33

Time to get your swashbuckle on. Maxi, The Dandy Of The South Seas, is heading to SoulCalibur VI.

The fan-favorite pirate has been a part of the series since the first entry. You can watch VI's version of the nunchaku-wielding fighter in action right here in this recently released trailer:

Soulcalibur VI is due out sometime this year. For more on the game check out The Witcher's Geralt, an unlockable character,  in action here.

Categories: Games

New Soulcalibur VI Trailer Showcases Maxi's Return

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 15:33

Time to get your swashbuckle on. Maxi, The Dandy Of The South Seas, is heading to SoulCalibur VI.

The fan-favorite pirate has been a part of the series since the first entry. You can watch VI's version of the nunchaku-wielding fighter in action right here in this recently released trailer:

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Soulcalibur VI is due out sometime this year. For more on the game check out The Witcher's Geralt, an unlockable character,  in action here.

Categories: Games

Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection Review - Keep The Past Alive

Gamespot News Feed - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 00:00

The Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection is another example of Digital Eclipse going above and beyond to properly port and pay tribute to a bounty of classic Capcom games. This anthology includes 12 Street Fighter arcade ports in all, and four of the best have been updated for online play. You can also find plenty of insightful history to unpack outside of combat. From soundtracks to sprite animation breakdowns, to high-res design documents for classic and cancelled games alike, there's a wealth of high-quality reference material to round out the robust selection of games.

All told, the 30th Anniversary Collection includes the original Street Fighter, five versions of Street Fighter II, three iterations of Street Fighter III, and the Street Fighter Alpha, Alpha 2, and Alpha 3. It's great to have all of these seemingly arcade-perfect ports in one place today, and with any luck, for many generations to come. Eagle-eyed aficionados will note the absence of Alpha 2 Gold and Alpha 3 Upper, both of which were available in 2006's Street Fighter Alpha Anthology on PS2, but their omission is far from a deal-breaker.

Likewise, while it may be momentarily disappointing that your favorite console ports are missing (understandable given the lofty scope of emulating multiple consoles) what is here plays wonderfully. If you already love these games, no matter how you played them in the past, the 30th Anniversary Collection will deliver a great experience. In some cases, you may just be looking for a quick trip down memory lane, because let's be honest, the original Street Fighter isn't great by modern standards; it is nonetheless awesome to see it preserved so well and be so easily accessible.

The enduring qualities of the collection's more notable games remain as strong as ever. Capcom's prowess for making exciting and attractive 2D fighting games was almost unparalleled during the '90s, and thus a game like Street Fighter III feels only marginally retro 19 years after the fact. In a similar fashion, Street Fighter Alpha 3's roster variety and variable fighting mechanics make it a fan-favorite to this day for reasons all its own. Does every version of Street Fighter II feel worth playing? Maybe not in isolation, but the evolution of that game in particular meant a lot to the community that grew up around it, and its prominent share of the games list helps tell the complete story of an important chapter in video game history.

Street Fighter's popularity rose out of tense face-to-face arcade bouts, and every game in this collection was released before the popularization of online battles. Over the years, however, Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting, Super Street Fighter II Turbo, Street Fighter Alpha 3, and Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike would wind up on various connected platforms. Those same games makeup the selection of online-enabled games here, and they exist under a single roof (one lobby can support fight requests for all of the available games at once.) Digital Eclipse has implemented a customizable framework that allows you to dial-in settings tied to input latency, giving you a small but meaningful advantage in the battle against poor network connections.

Just as the 30th Anniversary Collection breathes new life into classic games, its supplemental material helps you appreciate them in all new ways. There's an interactive timeline that chronicles 30 years of milestone and obscure events alike, often with breakout galleries accompanying the release dates of the biggest games. Each of the collection's 48 relevant characters has a dedicated profile with an interactive sprite gallery that lets you manually scrub through their most iconic attacks from each game, frame by frame. Perhaps most valuable of all, it's awesome to have complete soundtracks for each included game. There's a notable lack of video content given what was included in the 25th Anniversary Collection, but Capcom has otherwise given Digital Eclipse a ton of great and never-before-seen content to work with.

That's more or less the story of the 30th Anniversary Collection. It won't satisfy every specific demand, but it's still a big collection of awesome games and behind-the-scenes content that no Street Fighter fan should miss. Street Fighter is a series worth celebrating and Digital Eclipse has managed to do so in a manner that feels respectful to the series and to the people who keep the spirit of arcade battles alive.


Categories: Games

Should You Play Jurassic World Alive?

Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 20:43

The trailers for the forthcoming film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom hint that dinosaurs are no longer contained in the park and are on the loose in your neighborhoods and houses. Ludia's latest video game, Jurassic World Alive, echoes this premise, as it invites players out into the real world to use their mobile device's GPS to track down dinosaurs on the run. Yes, this game has a lot in common with Pokémon Go, but it also builds on the concepts introduced in Ludia's other mobile Jurassic Park and Jurassic World games.

I'm a big fan of Pokémon Go (with a level 36 character), and am finding Jurassic World Alive to be every bit as enjoyable in its opening moments. Tracking down new dinosaurs is a good time, and battling dinosaurs is a strategic affair, but I do worry about mid- to late-game progression, which appears to be tied to numerous types of in-game currency.

The opening hour of play, however, is hassle free. When you boot up the game, you see yourself standing on a map. Ludia uses Google Maps to give players a precise world to explore, right down to building and road placements. Much like Pokémon Go's gyms and stops, Jurassic World Alive players will find destinations on the map called supply drops. You'll need to physically walk over to these spots to be able to collect the drop, which contains coins, cash, and darts.

You'll also see various dinosaurs wandering wandering the wilds. You won't see many of them in any particular area. The most I've seen is three in one clickable space, and it's a much wider space than Go. You can click on a dinosaur that is a few blocks away and still engage with it. When you perform this action, you don't capture or battle it. You instead launch a drone into the sky, and are tasked to shoot darts at the dinosaur to retrieve some of its DNA. This action is handled through a timed minigame, which demands precision. You are trying to hit the center of a circle on the dinosaur. The better your aim, the more DNA is extracted. If you miss, the dart will either deflect off of the dinosaur or fall to the street. Again, darts are finite. I haven't run out of them in these early stages of play, but I wonder what would happen if I went for a five-mile walk and captured everything along the way. This minigame is fun, but it takes way too much time to load. From what I can tell, the game is more stable than Go, but it is much slower in its gameplay and interface.

When collect enough DNA from one dinosaur, you can recreate it in the lab and add it to your collection, of which there appears to be 100 different types of track down. If you keep farming the same type of dinosaur, you can level it up. I did this with my stegosaurus, which is now level two. I'll need to collect 150 more DNA samples to evolve it again. Evolving a dinosaur requires gold. The first level for a common stegosaurus cost me five gold. This next level will cost me 10 more.

The dinosaurs are nicely detailed and animated, allowing the user to click on them to watch them roar or swing their tails. Just collecting the beasts is an engaging affair, but their true purpose in this game is battling against other players' dinosaurs. When you collect four different types of beats, you can enter the Proving Grounds to learn how to battle against A.I.-controlled dinos. These fights are turn-based, pushing players to use different attacks and strategies to take down their opponents. Each dinosaur has a set amount of health (based on its level), as well as a variety of attributes for strength, speed, armor, damage, and critical chance. The strategies vary widely between each dinosaur type. My stegosaurus can deal 1.5x damage with its "thagomizer" attack, which also lowers my target's speed by 50 percent for three turns. My einiosaurus can stun opponents, and my velociraptor deals twice as much damage. While only one of your dinosaurs can be on the battlefield at once, you can swap it out at any time to change up your strategies. Again, only four dinosaurs can enter the fray.

Graduating from the Proving Grounds reveals the Fallen Kingdom, the area where you can battle other players and take on other missions. Matchmaking seems to work well, with opponents being found quickly and at the same level. The battles are quite intense, most coming down to one dino left on either side. There's definitely some guess work involved as to what your opponent may do, but using stuns and special attacks at the right times can turn the tide of war in your favor, allowing you to coast to victory in the final moments. Winning rewards you with coins and incubators that take time to open. Incubators hold a random number of darts, dino DNA, and the various forms of currency. You can wait a few minutes or hours to open one, or exchange the in-game cash to unseal it immediately.

I'm going to stick with Jurassic World Alive for a while. It isn't replacing Pokémon Go for me, but I can't say no to collecting dinosaurs, especially when it's handled this well. I'm still in the fact-finding stages, and have plenty of questions I need answered. How evil the in-game currency ends up being is a big one. I also want to know if specific dinosaurs are spawning in specific regions or if they are just randomly spawning all over the place. What can I say, I'm a sucker for these types of games, and can't wait to see what Niantic is planning with Harry Potter: Wizards Unite.

Categories: Games

Should You Play Jurassic World Alive?

Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 20:43

The trailers for the forthcoming film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom hint that dinosaurs are no longer contained in the park and are on the loose in your neighborhoods and houses. Ludia's latest video game, Jurassic World Alive, echoes this premise, as it invites players out into the real world to use their mobile device's GPS to track down dinosaurs on the run. Yes, this game has a lot in common with Pokémon Go, but it also builds on the concepts introduced in Ludia's other mobile Jurassic Park and Jurassic World games.

I'm a big fan of Pokémon Go (with a level 36 character), and am finding Jurassic World Alive to be every bit as enjoyable in its opening moments. Tracking down new dinosaurs is a good time, and battling dinosaurs is a strategic affair, but I do worry about mid- to late-game progression, which appears to be tied to numerous types of in-game currency.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

The opening hour of play, however, is hassle free. When you boot up the game, you see yourself standing on a map. Ludia uses Google Maps to give players a precise world to explore, right down to building and road placements. Much like Pokémon Go's gyms and stops, Jurassic World Alive players will find destinations on the map called supply drops. You'll need to physically walk over to these spots to be able to collect the drop, which contains coins, cash, and darts.

You'll also see various dinosaurs wandering wandering the wilds. You won't see many of them in any particular area. The most I've seen is three in one clickable space, and it's a much wider space than Go. You can click on a dinosaur that is a few blocks away and still engage with it. When you perform this action, you don't capture or battle it. You instead launch a drone into the sky, and are tasked to shoot darts at the dinosaur to retrieve some of its DNA. This action is handled through a timed minigame, which demands precision. You are trying to hit the center of a circle on the dinosaur. The better your aim, the more DNA is extracted. If you miss, the dart will either deflect off of the dinosaur or fall to the street. Again, darts are finite. I haven't run out of them in these early stages of play, but I wonder what would happen if I went for a five-mile walk and captured everything along the way. This minigame is fun, but it takes way too much time to load. From what I can tell, the game is more stable than Go, but it is much slower in its gameplay and interface.

When collect enough DNA from one dinosaur, you can recreate it in the lab and add it to your collection, of which there appears to be 100 different types of track down. If you keep farming the same type of dinosaur, you can level it up. I did this with my stegosaurus, which is now level two. I'll need to collect 150 more DNA samples to evolve it again. Evolving a dinosaur requires gold. The first level for a common stegosaurus cost me five gold. This next level will cost me 10 more.

The dinosaurs are nicely detailed and animated, allowing the user to click on them to watch them roar or swing their tails. Just collecting the beasts is an engaging affair, but their true purpose in this game is battling against other players' dinosaurs. When you collect four different types of beats, you can enter the Proving Grounds to learn how to battle against A.I.-controlled dinos. These fights are turn-based, pushing players to use different attacks and strategies to take down their opponents. Each dinosaur has a set amount of health (based on its level), as well as a variety of attributes for strength, speed, armor, damage, and critical chance. The strategies vary widely between each dinosaur type. My stegosaurus can deal 1.5x damage with its "thagomizer" attack, which also lowers my target's speed by 50 percent for three turns. My einiosaurus can stun opponents, and my velociraptor deals twice as much damage. While only one of your dinosaurs can be on the battlefield at once, you can swap it out at any time to change up your strategies. Again, only four dinosaurs can enter the fray.

Graduating from the Proving Grounds reveals the Fallen Kingdom, the area where you can battle other players and take on other missions. Matchmaking seems to work well, with opponents being found quickly and at the same level. The battles are quite intense, most coming down to one dino left on either side. There's definitely some guess work involved as to what your opponent may do, but using stuns and special attacks at the right times can turn the tide of war in your favor, allowing you to coast to victory in the final moments. Winning rewards you with coins and incubators that take time to open. Incubators hold a random number of darts, dino DNA, and the various forms of currency. You can wait a few minutes or hours to open one, or exchange the in-game cash to unseal it immediately.

I'm going to stick with Jurassic World Alive for a while. It isn't replacing Pokémon Go for me, but I can't say no to collecting dinosaurs, especially when it's handled this well. I'm still in the fact-finding stages, and have plenty of questions I need answered. How evil the in-game currency ends up being is a big one. I also want to know if specific dinosaurs are spawning in specific regions or if they are just randomly spawning all over the place. What can I say, I'm a sucker for these types of games, and can't wait to see what Niantic is planning with Harry Potter: Wizards Unite.

Categories: Games

Quarantine Circular Review: Who Are We, Really?

Gamespot News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 20:30

Much like its sudden release, Quarantine Circular aims to surprise. The second installment in Mike Bithell's short-story series doesn't have a direct narrative connection to the first game, Subsurface Circular, but it carries over the same sharp writing and intriguing central premise. This time the story jumps between characters instead of delivering its tale through a single lens, and while this structure leads to some tonal inconsistencies, Quarantine Circular is still a thought-provoking experience worth seeing through.

Like Subsurface Circular, Quarantine Circular is a straightforward narrative adventure. You never take control of its characters beyond determining how they respond to others during a conversation. A directed camera does a good job of keeping you engaged, utilizing sharp cuts and slow pans to evoke tension and serenity at the right moments. Its soundtrack, too, does an excellent job of setting the tone of each scene, especially after a sensational opening sequence.

Humanity is facing an extinction event in Quarantine Circular, which makes the simultaneous arrival of extraterrestrial life both inconvenient and suspicious. Taking place aboard a vessel tasked with maintaining a quarantine in a vulnerable city, you shift between multiple perspectives while trying to determine why the aliens have arrived and if they might be linked to the plague that's ravaging life across the globe. Although you never see the effects of the plague in action, Quarantine Circular ramps up the stakes quickly with a trail of clues that hint at what's happening outside the ship's confines. There's a palpable sense of urgency befitting the impending collapse of civilization.

Despite its brief two-hour runtime, Quarantine Circular manages to raise intriguing ideological questions about evolution, human nature, and tribalism. The arrival of extraterrestrial life opens questions about life beyond our planet at a time when there's little chance to preserve it. Issues concerning evolutionary fate and the human race's mistakes act as a centerpiece for the core conflict, which has some surprising twists before somewhat stumbling to a deflating conclusion. But it's a tale that will have you laughing moments before pondering deep existential questions, and it manages that balance with grace throughout.

Without the ability to see characters' expressions due to their bulky biohazard suits, dialogue has to do most of the heavy lifting.The color coding of each character helps keep things from getting too confusing, and it doesn't take long for Quarantine Circular to establish a strong sense of identity for each concealed face. Marc Peréz, for example, is a great early-game character with a contagious sense of optimism, and his inquisitiveness when coming face to face with the alien visitor for the first time mirrors your own. He eventually gives way to a set of characters with varied ethnicities and cultural backgrounds, all of which introduce differing yet surprisingly relatable perspectives for you to consider.

Conversational choices are often linear, giving you a handful of responses that sometimes loop back to the same outcome. They always align with the personality of the character you're guiding; you can't, in other words, role-playing however you see fit. You can't make a brooding security specialist suddenly sympathetic to a cause she doesn't believe in or work around the naivete of a young scientist. Quarantine Circular lets you make choices that affect events in some unexpected ways (so much so that you'll be enticed to replay certain sections to see alternative outcomes) but it never lets you mistake your role in its tale.

You also have the option to dive into alternative points of conversation that flesh out the premise and surrounding events. Sometimes you'll be limited as to how many of these conversational diversions you can take, and some choices lock out others. You'll never feel as though you're missing out on anything specifically crucial with your decisions, but your curiosity is often rewarded with morsels of information that influence more important choices down the line.

Infrequently, these focus points are used to inject some light puzzles into the story, which doesn't always work in the dialogue-heavy structure of the rest of the game. There's a section at the end that is specifically guilty of obstruction, bringing a powerful decision-making moment to a crawl as you rummage through character notes to hunt down a password. It breaks the flow of the game, but thankfully it's not a persistent hindrance.

What is slightly more annoying is the frequent hopping between characters. Quarantine Circular can shift perspectives multiple times in a single act, which gets confusing with the strict response options you have to choose from. The cuts feel jarring, and the writing is sometimes forced to acknowledge it. One scene cuts so rapidly that the responses are sign-posted to ensure you know who you're replying as. It's disappointing, too, when you're forced to change your perspective on a given situation during its potential climax, as it undercuts the emotional resonance the scene had built up all along.

Quarantine Circular's endings also struggle to prop up the stories that led to them. They aren't as surprising as the tales that they're meant to be rounding out, often concluding in transparent ways. They might factor in small decisions you considered inconsequential at the time, but the endings fail to encapsulate all the questions the story asks into a thought-provoking final message. Quarantine Circular ends too abruptly, and without much impact.

But it's still a tale worth giving the little time it asks of you, if only to be entertained by its intriguing characters and inspired by their existential pondering. Quarantine Circular is a mostly well-written sci-fi tale that doesn't succumb to tired tropes or obvious plot contrivances to draw you in. Instead it uses its limited working space to deliver a captivating tale about human nature and our theoretical place within the universe.

Categories: Games

The First Gameplay Trailer Shows Off Surprising Mechanics

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 16:13

World Seeker is an open world One Piece game, and it looks like it may be taking cues from the Batman: Arkham games.

Along with being able to swing and leap through the game's open city world, the gameplay trailer also shows Luffy activating a detective vision-like ability to look through walls and see enemies. The trailer also shows off a healthy collection of Luffy's combat abilities, many taken directly from the manga/anime.

One Piece: World Seeker is coming later this year.

Categories: Games

The First Gameplay Trailer Shows Off Surprising Mechanics

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 16:13

World Seeker is an open world One Piece game, and it looks like it may be taking cues from the Batman: Arkham games.

Along with being able to swing and leap through the game's open city world, the gameplay trailer also shows Luffy activating a detective vision-like ability to look through walls and see enemies. The trailer also shows off a healthy collection of Luffy's combat abilities, many taken directly from the manga/anime.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

One Piece: World Seeker is coming later this year.

Categories: Games

Hands-On With The Newest Title And Its Brand New Features

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 16:00

Despite his long slumber, Mega Man has a history synonymous with gaming. With Mega Man 11, the blue bomber is attempting the kind of revival fraught with the same kind of dangers that dozens of other series have tried before with few coming out the other end successful. Mega Man's newest adventure, however, might be more well-equipped for a grand return than any of his former contemporaries.

We got a chance to play the newest build of Mega Man 11, which features BlockMan's Egyptian/Aztec fusion-themed level and FuseMan's newly playable electric bugaloo around a power plant. Mega Man traverses these environments with his usual repertoire of running, jumping, sliding, and holding in the charge button the entire time.

The newest tool for Mega Man to use, however, is the Gear system. Dr. Wily has an epiphany of the gear ability system in his advanced age, recalling that he pioneered the technology with Dr. Light when they were both young. The gears can slow down time, power up a fighting robot, or combine both for a last-ditch effort in battle. Wily decides to power up his current set of robot masters with the gear system and Mega Man insists that he also receives the upgrade from Dr. Light to fight off these powered-up enemies.

Using the shoulder buttons, Mega Man can activate the Speed Gear, which slows down time, or the Power Gear, which powers up his Mega Buster and gives him two full charge shots at its strongest charge. Both abilities are set on a cooldown, meaning you can't just walk through a level with time permanently slowed down. Activating either buys you a few seconds to take advantage of the gear until you stop using it or it runs out, requiring a full cooldown to zero before it can be used again.

Mega Man can also build up a charge through the level that allows him to combine both gears as a desperation move, slowing down time and giving his Mega Buster an extra bit of oomph. The super fighting robot better have defeated the boss with this ultimate attack, though, or he'll overheat and be unable to charge shots for a limited time.

The gears are not an easy button as I initially feared they would be. It allows the designers to be a bit more devilish with the design of optional challenges. An E-Tank in Block Man's stage requires platforming off a falling block to reach, which is doable for those with fast reaction times, but made just a bit easier using the Speed Gear. The Gears alone won't make anyone look like a speedrunner, but they provide a little smoothing out of some of Mega Man's hard edges.

The robot masters also have this same technology and use it to add different phases to the boss fight. BlockMan uses the Power Gear to assemble a block-filled mech that looks like something akin to Mega Man's monstrous rival the Yellow Devil. The gears end up making the boss feel fresher than when they simply bounced around the stage hitting you with projectiles, as classic as that formula may be.

FuseMan's stage revisits a trope well-worn in Mega Man's long history, an electric-themed stage littered with traps around Mega Man's feet. Fuses shoot electric beams as you go through the stage, invoking a Mario-style level design of introducing a stage obstacle and iterating on its use over the level. Before too long, Mega Man is avoiding moving electric beams while platforming up a vertical corridor and avoiding the exposed flooring.

As someone who has grown up alongside the Mega Man series and counts its games as some of my favorites, I was initially fairly worried about whether the eleventh game could successfully channel the spirit of its predecessors. After having played it, I am confident that the final product feels like Mega Man, and the developers understand just how difficult to define that feel can be. The blue bomber is modernizing, which in itself can be a game of inches, but he has not lost his robotic soul in the process.

Mega Man 11 releases on Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on October 2.

Categories: Games

Hands-On With The Newest Title And Its Brand New Features

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 16:00

Despite his long slumber, Mega Man has a history synonymous with gaming. With Mega Man 11, the blue bomber is attempting the kind of revival fraught with the same kind of dangers that dozens of other series have tried before with few coming out the other end successful. Mega Man's newest adventure, however, might be more well-equipped for a grand return than any of his former contemporaries.

We got a chance to play the newest build of Mega Man 11, which features BlockMan's Egyptian/Aztec fusion-themed level and FuseMan's newly playable electric bugaloo around a power plant. Mega Man traverses these environments with his usual repertoire of running, jumping, sliding, and holding in the charge button the entire time.

The newest tool for Mega Man to use, however, is the Gear system. Dr. Wily has an epiphany of the gear ability system in his advanced age, recalling that he pioneered the technology with Dr. Light when they were both young. The gears can slow down time, power up a fighting robot, or combine both for a last-ditch effort in battle. Wily decides to power up his current set of robot masters with the gear system and Mega Man insists that he also receives the upgrade from Dr. Light to fight off these powered-up enemies.

Using the shoulder buttons, Mega Man can activate the Speed Gear, which slows down time, or the Power Gear, which powers up his Mega Buster and gives him two full charge shots at its strongest charge. Both abilities are set on a cooldown, meaning you can't just walk through a level with time permanently slowed down. Activating either buys you a few seconds to take advantage of the gear until you stop using it or it runs out, requiring a full cooldown to zero before it can be used again.

Mega Man can also build up a charge through the level that allows him to combine both gears as a desperation move, slowing down time and giving his Mega Buster an extra bit of oomph. The super fighting robot better have defeated the boss with this ultimate attack, though, or he'll overheat and be unable to charge shots for a limited time.

The gears are not an easy button as I initially feared they would be. It allows the designers to be a bit more devilish with the design of optional challenges. An E-Tank in Block Man's stage requires platforming off a falling block to reach, which is doable for those with fast reaction times, but made just a bit easier using the Speed Gear. The Gears alone won't make anyone look like a speedrunner, but they provide a little smoothing out of some of Mega Man's hard edges.

The robot masters also have this same technology and use it to add different phases to the boss fight. BlockMan uses the Power Gear to assemble a block-filled mech that looks like something akin to Mega Man's monstrous rival the Yellow Devil. The gears end up making the boss feel fresher than when they simply bounced around the stage hitting you with projectiles, as classic as that formula may be.

FuseMan's stage revisits a trope well-worn in Mega Man's long history, an electric-themed stage littered with traps around Mega Man's feet. Fuses shoot electric beams as you go through the stage, invoking a Mario-style level design of introducing a stage obstacle and iterating on its use over the level. Before too long, Mega Man is avoiding moving electric beams while platforming up a vertical corridor and avoiding the exposed flooring.

As someone who has grown up alongside the Mega Man series and counts its games as some of my favorites, I was initially fairly worried about whether the eleventh game could successfully channel the spirit of its predecessors. After having played it, I am confident that the final product feels like Mega Man, and the developers understand just how difficult to define that feel can be. The blue bomber is modernizing, which in itself can be a game of inches, but he has not lost his robotic soul in the process.

Mega Man 11 releases on Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on October 2.

Categories: Games

Learning What Adventure Mode Serves Up

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 14:01

Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash launched on Wii U in 2015 to poor reception from fans and critics alike. The game added little in way of new mechanics and even less in terms of reasons to return to the game time and again. With gameplay that expands your arsenal, an improved online suite, and a better list of modes, Mario Tennis Aces on Switch hopes to avoid the double fault and deliver a better experience for players. I went hands on with one of Aces' main attractions, adventure mode, to learn the basics of the new gameplay and see if this entry is more likely to sink its hooks into players.

You only play as Mario in adventure mode, but the story features many character besides Nintendo's mascot. Luigi has uncovered an evil tennis racket, and it has taken him, Wario, and Waluigi hostage. Mario sets out to rescue the captive characters and uncover the secrets of the racket's past. The journey takes Mario to Bask Kingdom, a dominion previously ruined by the powerful racket. To fight for his brother and the destroyed kingdom, Mario learns new abilities, which play out as brief tutorial stages in adventure mode.

As I work through the early lessons, I relearn the basics of Nintendo's brand of tennis. Once we get the different strokes down, I move on to learning the new abilities Mario Tennis Aces introduces. As I rally back and forth with my opponent, an energy gauge fills in the corner of the screen. I can use available energy for zone speed, which slows time and allows me to get into position, or zone shots, which I can perform if I get into proper position and expel energy as I swing my racket. If I initiate a zone shot, my character springs into the air and an aiming reticle allows me to place my shot; the longer I take to aim, the more energy I consume. You can aim away from your opponent, but if you want to challenge them, you can hit it right at them. If they don't time their counter correctly, the powerful shot will damage their racket. Inflict too much damage to your opponent's racket and it'll break, giving you the win by default.

Mario's newfound zone powers are great, but they're no match for the special shot, which can be initiated from any spot on the court when the energy gauge is maxed out. When you use a special shot, you launch into a character-specific cutscene and enter the aiming sequence again. This time, if your opponent tries and fails to return the shot properly, it'll destroy their racket in one hit. This means that if you decide to test your skills and return a special shot, failure carries a hefty price. 

The final shot type I learn is a trick shot, which causes my character to leap, lunge, or flip in the direction of the ball in a desperate attempt. It's tough to be successful with, but using this shot, I was able to reach several balls I would've just watched go by in most tennis games. With my new arsenal of attacks, I jump into the first few real challenges of adventure mode. From special-rules matches against other characters on the roster like Spike and Donkey Kong, to a minigame where I must return balls from a wall of piranha plants, adventure mode looks to provide fun diversions that give you additional ways to enjoy the game of tennis. As I complete challenges, I earn experience for Mario to improve his shot speed, run speed, and agility ratings. I also earn new rackets, which have their own set of attributes including attack, defense, and durability. I imagine that durability rating will be one to focus on if you're not great at timing your returns on zone shots.

My time with adventure mode culminates with a showdown against a boss: Petey Piranha. He puts wicked spins on the ball, but by simply continuing the rally, I chip away at his stamina. Once his bar is depleted, he tips over and I enter a zone shot to deal damage to his weak spot. After a few cycles of this, the battle is mine. It's a fun twist on the core tennis mechanics and I look forward to more creative boss fights.

Mario Tennis Aces seems to show a Camelot team that took the criticisms of Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash to heart. With myriad new gameplay mechanics and a fun adventure mode, I'm looking forward to seeing the full scope of the improvements when the game launches on June 22.

In the meantime, you can see the trailer for adventure mode below.

Categories: Games

Learning What Adventure Mode Serves Up

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 14:01

We try out the various new shots and play a few stages of adventure mode.

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Categories: Games

Medieval Action RPG Has You Play As Fish-Powered Robot

Game Informer News Feed - Sun, 05/27/2018 - 20:11

Feudal Alloy, an upcoming Metroidvania action RPG, centers around a bizarre concept. You play through a medieval era as a robot powered by a goldfish, who is on a quest to defeat bandits that burned down their home.

You're not the only goldfish piloting the robot. In this strange world, all enemies you go head-to-head with are similarly powered by fish. Feudal Alloy features hand-drawn 2D art, giving it a storybook vibe. Developer Attu Games describes the gameplay as discovering a "huge interconnected world, filled with wide range of enemies, bosses, skills, equipments and side quests."

Check out the trailer below.

Feudal Alloy is expected to launch on PC later this year, though no specific release has been announced.

Categories: Games

Medieval Action RPG Has You Play As Fish-Powered Robot

Game Informer News Feed - Sun, 05/27/2018 - 20:11

Feudal Alloy, an upcoming Metroidvania action RPG, centers around a bizarre concept. You play through a medieval era as a robot powered by a goldfish, who is on a quest to defeat bandits that burned down their home.

You're not the only goldfish piloting the robot. In this strange world, all enemies you go head-to-head with are similarly powered by fish. Feudal Alloy features hand-drawn 2D art, giving it a storybook vibe. Developer Attu Games describes the gameplay as discovering a "huge interconnected world, filled with wide range of enemies, bosses, skills, equipments and side quests."

Check out the trailer below.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Feudal Alloy is expected to launch on PC later this year, though no specific release has been announced.

Categories: Games

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